From being a Corporate Girl to Travel Girl- Shivya Nath

Waking up in the same bed is the usual boring thing everybody go through. How exciting it would be when every other day you’ll wake up in different bed, different cities? Exciting or we say tempting to live that kind of life.

Welcome back Creatorshala’s Readers, we are back with another inspirational story. Any idea how it goes when you leave your five figure salary, comfort zone of corporate life. No idea right, but Shivya Nath did exactly the same thing at the age of 23.

Her journey from being a corporate girl to travel influencer to an author comes with many exciting adventures and a life we all dream about started in the year 2009 when she went to Singapore to study and graduated in the middle of the financial recession of 2009. Due to the financial recession the companies in which she wanted to work were not hiring. Hence, she landed a job with the Singapore Tourism Board where she learned about social media, and started following the journey of travel bloggers across the world.

In the year 2011, Shivya Nath quit her fascinating corporate job to travel the world. Being a travel blogger was incidentally as she has always enjoyed creating content and wanted to travel while working with social companies in India. Along with this she continued her writing and got her articles with many publications like The Times of India, The Hindu and National Geographic Traveler.  Her basic motive behind all this was to bring beautiful stories and different perspectives of life and travel to her readers and inspire them to kick out their comfort zones and discover the world in unconventional ways.

In the path of a dream life she came across many challenges as she left the lavish corporate world, making her life in a sustainable way was pretty hard. In her interview she mentioned about her biggest challenge was to have a mindset of travel industry with respect of freelancers get compensated.

People think that travel blogging is all about travelling , partying and getting paid for it but Shivya Nath know exactly what it takes to be one as there was a time when she just had 150 bucks in bank account and timing can never be best when she was half way across globe in Panama.

Behind every successful travel blog are years of hard work, dedication and rejection. And she has lived all the phases of it! At present she seeks an adventurous where she enjoys and nomadic life.

Her very first book The Shooting Star is like a dairy where her all travel adventures are penned down by her and she just hopes to inspire everyone to get out their comfort zone.

Happy Blogging!

View this post on Instagram

3 questions popped up in literally every conversation I had in Tajikistan. Age? Shohar (husband)? Bacche (kids)? The women chilling by the lake with their kids looked surprised and dismayed at my answers. When I tried to explain “azadi doost doram” (I like my freedom), most looked bewildered but one began to clap her hands, blessing me, like she got it. . . I peeped through a broken fence and spotted an 80+ year old grandmother sitting alone under an apricot tree, merrily eating apricots. She looked busted when she saw me, but quickly invited me through a little wooden door, into her secret apricot orchard by the gushing river. Together we collected ripe juicy apricots from the trees, as she tried to convince me to have atleast one son! I sat silently awhile, a bit exhausted from all the patriarchy in play, when she suddenly took my sunglasses and wore them on her beautifully aging face, heartily laughing, revealing her few remaining teeth. . . On the stunning shores of the 7th lake, a group of Tajik men were boiling water for tea on a portable stove, their picnic all laid out. Each insisted I join them for a bite. Only lamb was on offer and since I don’t eat any, out came bottles of local vodka. . . A woman walking home with her niece and donkey stopped me on the road. After the basic chat, she plunged into a serious conversation. I kept saying “Tajik cum”, I don’t understand much Tajik, but she kept speaking, like she just needed someone to hear her out. So I nodded along. Laughed when she did, became solemn when she did, hugged warmly before we parted. . . A young woman in her twenties told me her husband had divorced her out of the blue (triple talaq is still common here), so she went to India, driven by her love for Shahrukh Khan! There she found out he’s too old for her, so she enrolled in dance school, learnt classical dance, even met Hema Malini 😲 . . Back home, my host family was gathered around their apricot tree, collecting apricots, so I joined them – and we made fresh apricot jam and baked non (local bread) in the clay oven the next morning. . . Oh Tajikistan, I’m going to miss you 💚 . . On assignment for USAID & @travel_tojikiston

A post shared by Shivya Nath (@shivya) on

Facebook Comments

More Similar Posts

From being a Corporate Girl to Travel Girl- Shivya Nath

Waking up in the same bed is the usual boring thing everybody go through. How exciting it would be when every other day you’ll wake up in different bed, different cities? Exciting or we say tempting to live that kind of life.

Welcome back Creatorshala’s Readers, we are back with another inspirational story. Any idea how it goes when you leave your five figure salary, comfort zone of corporate life. No idea right, but Shivya Nath did exactly the same thing at the age of 23.

Her journey from being a corporate girl to travel influencer to an author comes with many exciting adventures and a life we all dream about started in the year 2009 when she went to Singapore to study and graduated in the middle of the financial recession of 2009. Due to the financial recession the companies in which she wanted to work were not hiring. Hence, she landed a job with the Singapore Tourism Board where she learned about social media, and started following the journey of travel bloggers across the world.

In the year 2011, Shivya Nath quit her fascinating corporate job to travel the world. Being a travel blogger was incidentally as she has always enjoyed creating content and wanted to travel while working with social companies in India. Along with this she continued her writing and got her articles with many publications like The Times of India, The Hindu and National Geographic Traveler.  Her basic motive behind all this was to bring beautiful stories and different perspectives of life and travel to her readers and inspire them to kick out their comfort zones and discover the world in unconventional ways.

In the path of a dream life she came across many challenges as she left the lavish corporate world, making her life in a sustainable way was pretty hard. In her interview she mentioned about her biggest challenge was to have a mindset of travel industry with respect of freelancers get compensated.

People think that travel blogging is all about travelling , partying and getting paid for it but Shivya Nath know exactly what it takes to be one as there was a time when she just had 150 bucks in bank account and timing can never be best when she was half way across globe in Panama.

Behind every successful travel blog are years of hard work, dedication and rejection. And she has lived all the phases of it! At present she seeks an adventurous where she enjoys and nomadic life.

Her very first book The Shooting Star is like a dairy where her all travel adventures are penned down by her and she just hopes to inspire everyone to get out their comfort zone.

Happy Blogging!

View this post on Instagram

3 questions popped up in literally every conversation I had in Tajikistan. Age? Shohar (husband)? Bacche (kids)? The women chilling by the lake with their kids looked surprised and dismayed at my answers. When I tried to explain “azadi doost doram” (I like my freedom), most looked bewildered but one began to clap her hands, blessing me, like she got it. . . I peeped through a broken fence and spotted an 80+ year old grandmother sitting alone under an apricot tree, merrily eating apricots. She looked busted when she saw me, but quickly invited me through a little wooden door, into her secret apricot orchard by the gushing river. Together we collected ripe juicy apricots from the trees, as she tried to convince me to have atleast one son! I sat silently awhile, a bit exhausted from all the patriarchy in play, when she suddenly took my sunglasses and wore them on her beautifully aging face, heartily laughing, revealing her few remaining teeth. . . On the stunning shores of the 7th lake, a group of Tajik men were boiling water for tea on a portable stove, their picnic all laid out. Each insisted I join them for a bite. Only lamb was on offer and since I don’t eat any, out came bottles of local vodka. . . A woman walking home with her niece and donkey stopped me on the road. After the basic chat, she plunged into a serious conversation. I kept saying “Tajik cum”, I don’t understand much Tajik, but she kept speaking, like she just needed someone to hear her out. So I nodded along. Laughed when she did, became solemn when she did, hugged warmly before we parted. . . A young woman in her twenties told me her husband had divorced her out of the blue (triple talaq is still common here), so she went to India, driven by her love for Shahrukh Khan! There she found out he’s too old for her, so she enrolled in dance school, learnt classical dance, even met Hema Malini 😲 . . Back home, my host family was gathered around their apricot tree, collecting apricots, so I joined them – and we made fresh apricot jam and baked non (local bread) in the clay oven the next morning. . . Oh Tajikistan, I’m going to miss you 💚 . . On assignment for USAID & @travel_tojikiston

A post shared by Shivya Nath (@shivya) on

Facebook Comments

More Similar Posts

Menu